Wednesday, March 11, 2015

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY







WILLIAM ZEIGLER, JR. 1913

    William Ziegler, Jr.(1891-1958) was a prominent businessman, politician, sportsman, and president of several foundations for the blind, was the adopted nephew of the millionaire William Ziegler (1843-1905). At the time of his adopted father's death in 1905, the 13-year-old inherited some $16 million which grew to over $30 million under trustee guidance.

     He married Gladys Virginia Watson as soon as he reached majority(21) in 1912. They first occupied a succession of apartment houses and rented townhouses

    According to the will of the deceased Mr. Ziegler, his heir was to be paid in four installments—the first at twenty-five years, the second at thirty, the third at thirty and the fourth at forty. In the meantime the boy was to receive an allowance. In 1913 he petitioned three years ahead of time that he be given his first installment because he "needed the money."  In 1919 Mr. Ziegler engaged the architect Frederick Sterner to design a mansion on the site of three old brownstones on 63rd Street just off Fifth Avenue. However, the marriage didn't take, and after living in the house for one year, the couple split and he put the place on the market.   The marriage ended on September 9, 1926 when Gladys obtained a divorce in ParisSix months later he married Miss Helen Martin Murphy, the granddaughter of Edward Murphy, Jr. a United States senator from New York, with whom he moved to 116-118 East 55th Street.

    Soon after the couple left there was a proposal to convert it to a hospital for actors and actressesA few years later it was acquired by Norman Bailey Woolworth, third cousin of F.W. Woolworth who occupied until the late 40's after which Mr. Woolworth gave it to the New York Academy of Sciences. The Academy originally put the building on the market in 2001, and the Emir of Qatar was reportedly going to purchase the property for $27 million that fall, but the deal eventually fell throughIn 2005 the house was purchased by investor Len Blavatnik for $31,250,000. For five weeks in November and December the house is reverted to its former grandeur in the splendid format of a Holiday House.
    


THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
DEMOLITION AND EVACUATION OF SITE
In 1919 the Zeigler's  tore down three brownstones and engaged Sterner & Wolfe to create an Italian Renaissance palazzo for the 75-foot-wide property, one of the last private palaces constructed in the city. The cost was reported to be $1,000,000.

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
SUB-BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN 
The 75-foot-wide, four-story mansion is laid out in a 20,646-square-foot sprawl that includes a basement, a sub-basement and a penthouse. 

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
SHOWING FOOTINGS FOR COURT
Ziegler residence. #2-4-6 East 63rd St. N.Y.C. 


THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
THE EXTERIOR, EXECUTED IN GEORGIAN MARBLE, IS ITALIAN IN FEELING
 The living-room, library, dining-room and stair hall surround a central court, in which there is a fountain. Reversing the usual plan of city houses, it is seventy-five feet wide.

 
THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
 Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
The building is five stories, in Italian Renaissance style. The interior rooms face a central garden court, in which a great fountain splashes the shrubbery and the flower beds. At night the fountain is illuminated. Throughout the house the doors are of spike-studded oak and bronze, and in the main hall and the foyer the floors are of black and gold marble from Spezia, Italy, and from the Convent of Montarenti, in Tuscany. The ceilings on the main floor are in plaster reliefs, and in the entrance hall stands a sixteenth century Florentine mantel  from Raspannatti House, in Florence..

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
ENTRANCE DOOR
The stone facade has a round arched entrance and features large windows with scroll cornices cartouches and a tall iron fence running the entire width of the building. 


THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
ENTRANCE DOOR

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
ENTRANCE DOOR
  
THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
FIRST FLOOR PLAN
  
THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
FIRST FLOOR PLAN
Along the front, the architect put an entry hall on the left and a kitchen and servants’ dining room on the right. Across the middle, there was a living room on the left — 25 feet by 40 feet — followed by 25 feet of open courtyard in the center and the dining room on the right. Across the back were two small garden areas flanking a library. 


THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
THE CHARM OF ITALY DOMINATES THE ENTRANCE HALL

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
ENTRANCE HALL
THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
ENTRANCE HAL
THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
HALL
THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
HALL

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
STAIR HALL
THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
STAIR HALL

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
HALL, VIEW INTO DRAWING ROOM  

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
DRAWING ROOM
The drawing room was transplanted from a Wood Court Park mansion in London, believed to have been built under the direction of Robert Adam about 1791.

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
DRAWING ROOM
THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
CHARACTERIZED BY SIMPLICITY, THE GEORGIAN  DRAWING ROOM, WITH PANELED WALLS, HAS AN AIR OF ELEGANCE
Besides giving a distinctive appearance to this room, the paneling is interesting in   that it was taken from  a  Port man Street house in London.

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
DRAWING ROOM


THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
DRAWING ROOM

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
DRAWING ROOM

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
DRAWING ROOM
THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
THE ITALIAN STYLE ALSO MARKS THE DINING ROOM
 The antique furniture, upholstered in Sixteenth Century velvets, and the beautiful carved mantel are admirably set off by the floor of Tunis tile. Perhaps the most striking of all is the dining room, with its vaulted ceiling, its African tile floor and a mantel which was brought from the Piccolomini Palace in Siena, Italy.

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NYSterner & Wolfe, Architects
DINING ROOM
The Italian "style" was changed to an English theme with the later additions of a decorative plaster ceiling and oak paneling and floors. 

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
DINING ROOM
THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
LIBRARY
The walls of the library, of carved English oak, were imported from a Warwickshire house built during the reign of Queen Elizabeth.


THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
THE OUTSTANDING FEATURE OF THE ELIZABETHAN LIBRARY IS THE UNUSUALLY HANDSOME MANTELPIECE
 Finished in oak, this room was taken from a house in Warwickshire and retains all its English charm.   The recessed bookcases, with the tasteful decorative scheme and furniture, create a delightful home like effect.

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
LIBRARY

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
LIBRARY

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NYSterner & Wolfe, ArchitectsLIBRARY

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
KITCHEN

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
KITCHEN

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
KITCHEN

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
KITCHEN
Add caption

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
MAIN STAIRWAY

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
MAIN STAIRWAY
THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
MAIN STAIRWAY
THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
 MAIN STAIRWAY
The walls, floor and stairs are carried out in travatine stone which, with the decorative ceiling and iron and bronze stair rail, strikes a fine note.

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
MAIN STAIRWAY
THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
MAIN STAIRWAY

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
STAIRWAY HALL

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
COURT

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
VIEW INTO COURT

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
COURT

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
COURT
THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
COURT
THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
SECOND FLOOR PLAN

The second floor was taken up almost entirely by the Zieglers’ separate bedrooms, each with its own dressing room.

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
SECOND FLOOR PLAN
Mr. Ziegler's original bath and dressing room were lost in an alteration.

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
MAIN STAIRS

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
MAIN STAIRS
THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
MAIN STAIRS, VIEW TO COURT

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
SECOND STORY HALL

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
SECOND STORY HALL

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
SECOND STORY LANDING
THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
SECOND STORY HALL

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
MRS. ZIEGLER'S BEDROOM
Gladys’ expansive suite comprised a foyer, boudoir, bedroom, and bath. 

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
MRS. ZIEGLER'S BEDROOM

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
MRS. ZIEGLER'S BEDROOM
THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
VAULTED FOYER

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
PASSAGEWAY
THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
MRS. ZIEGLER'S BATHROOM
THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
MRS. ZIEGLER'S BATHROOM

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
MRS. ZIEGLER'S BOUDOIR

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
MRS. ZIEGLER'S BOUDOIR

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
MR. ZIEGLER'S BEDROOM

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
MR. ZIEGLER'S BEDROOM
THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
MR. ZIEGLER'S DRESSING ROOM
THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
THIRD FLOOR PLAN
Up another flight were the children's rooms, a day nursery, and guest rooms.
THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NYSterner & Wolfe, Architects
THIRD FLOOR PLAN
Bedroom No. 2 lost its bathroom when a stairwell was cut into the structure to reach the fourth floor.
THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
THIRD FLOOR STAIRWELL

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
THIRD FLOOR STAIRWELL AND HALL
THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
THIRD FLOOR LANDING
THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
GUEST BEDROOM NO. 2

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
CHILD'S ROOM NO. 2
THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
FOURTH FLOOR PLAN
THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
FOURTH FLOOR PLAN
Maids rooms on the forth floor were lost during a 1932 renovation.
THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
PLAYROOM, FORTH FLOOR
After the Charles Lindbergh baby kidnapping, a large playroom was constructed on the fourth floor.
THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
PLAYROOM, FORTH FLOOR
THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
PLAYROOM, FORTH FLOOR

THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR., 2 EAST 63RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY
Sterner & Wolfe, Architects
PENTHOUSE LEVEL

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A  $2,000,000 "THEATRICAL HOSPITAL"
The William Ziegler Jr. house at 2 East Sixty-third Street, one of the show places of upper Fifth Avenue, is about to be converted into a hospital for the exclusive use of actors and actresses. Several guest rooms would become $100-a-day hospital suites for the use of wealthy stars. These suites will consist of a bedroom, a reception room for visitors, a private maids' room and nurses' room and also a flower room, in which can be kept floral gifts.

     Ziegler was well known for his sports activities, including yacht racing, show dogs, and breeding, showing, and racing horses. Besides the below pleasures of Mr Zeigler mention of a Canadian cabin "200 miles in the interior of Canada" adds to the list.

     Ziegler's interest in horse breeding and racing soon brought him to Virginia's hunt country, where he bought "Burrland Farm" at the end of 1926 and started one of the area's most successful thoroughbred breeding and training farms.






November 22, 1927

ZIEGLER WILL OCCUPY VIRGINIA ESTATE SOON 
Work of Transforming "Burrland Hall" Into Model Race-Horse Farm About Completed.


The estate comprises about 250 acres and is being developed by Mr. Ziegler into a fine race-horse breeding farm.


Since last March a small army of men has been at work, some of them on night shifts, getting the estate ready for Mr. Ziegler, and, as he desires to eat his Thanksgiving dinner in the remodeled mansion on Thursday, nearly 200 artisans were still engaged today putting the finishing touches to various parts of the estate.


"BURRLAND HALL"
When William Ziegler, Jr. bought the property he hired New York architect William
Lawrence Bottomley to design a large addition to the house. Bottomley's addition transformed the house into a brick, Georgian Revival mansion with a full-height, Tuscan-columned portico. During the same period, Bottomley designed a Georgian Revival town house for Ziegler in New York City. Bottomley also designed the stable complex on the farm in a similar, Georgian Revival style. The Burrland house was deliberately gutted and burned down in 1961 by then-owner, Eleonora R. Sears of Boston, in an attempt to reduce her property taxes. 
     According to all accounts of the day, by 1930 he had built Burrland into one of the best equipped stud farms on the Atlantic Seaboard. BOUNDING HOME, who captured the 1944 Belmont Stakes, was bred here. Both Mr. and Mrs. Ziegler maintained racing stables at Burrland, with colts racing in Mr. Ziegler's name and fillies carrying the scarlet and green silks of Middleburg Stable, the nom de course of Mrs. Ziegler.

   Burrland Farm, Burnt Mill Farm, an adjacent property,  and several small farms were combined to become Hickory Tree Farm in 1966.


"SUNSHINE"
Originally a winter estate, it was designed by Willis Irvin and built for William Zeigler in 1927. 
In 1956 a small group of Aiken friends decided to create a supper club by purchasing the Georgian-style residence. http://www.greenboundaryclub.com/


The dimensions of THE GEM are: Length over all, 163 feet; beam, eighteen feet; draft, seven feet. Contract speed is twenty-two knots, and the engines are two four-cylinder triple expansion steam engines, operated by two water tube boilers using oil fuel.


February 14, 1914
Well named indeed is the steam yacht which this year will carry her owner, Mr. William Zeigler, Jr., and his friends on many a cruise. The vessel is called the Gem. She is perfectly named, just as she was perfectly designed and perfectly constructed. Messrs. Cox & Stevens are the nautical architects.

In addition to using his boat as a pleasure craft, Mr. Ziegler will steam up and down on board his vessel when he proceeds to his affairs of business in Manhattan.

The yacht combines all the requisites of the conventional cruising steam yacht with the requisite speed for express service between New York and Mr. Zeigler's home near Stamford, Conn. She is not a light displacement boat by any means, but is substantially built, has good beam, and is an excellent seaboat. She has two large deckhouses, the forward one containing a very roomy dining saloon, aft of which is the galley, and the after one being a music room with doors opening directly aft to the quarter deck, which is of unusual length and practically clear of obstructions.

The accommodations for the owner and guests are below aft and are surprisingly liberal, the owner himself having a room eleven feet in length the full width of the ship, and communicating with two private bathrooms and a large dressing-room, the stateroom being finished in selected satinwood. At the after end of the vessel is a comfortable double stateroom and between this room and the owner's quarters are three very large single staterooms for guests, one smaller single stateroom which can be used as a maid’s room, and two bathrooms.

The finish in the guests’ quarters throughout is colonial in character, doors, furniture and trim being of mahogany, and bulkheads and side walls of white enamel. All decorations of the yacht are harmonious and have been executed with the greatest care and good taste. All the electric fixtures are of special design and the upholstery and furnishings are rich and handsome.

Setting sail on a 53-foot schooner such as BOUNDING HOME, owned by William Ziegler, Jr. can be a real feat of seamanship in a single-handed race. That's why only top skippers are invited to race in CB&S Creepstakes.




WILLIAM ZIEGLER, JR.,  NORTON, CONN. 
His father purchased Great Island in 1902 for a summer estate. Ziegler employed more than two hundred men to improve the property. The workers created an enviable estate, complete with a yacht basin, beach, mansion, outbuildings and a polo field. William Ziegler Jr. look up residency during the summer months and continued to improve the property over the course of several years.
William Ziegler Jr. died at 116th East 55th Street March 3rd, 1952. 

William Ziegler, Jr. (1891-1958)

WOODLAWN CEMETERY, BRONX, N. Y.
    
    William Ziegler, Sr., founder of the Royal Baking Powder Co., died on May 24, 1905, leaving his wife, Electa Matilda Ziegler, and an adopted nephew and niece, William and Florence Brandt, who were taken in after their parents messy divorce. William C. Brandt legally became William Ziegler, Jr., was 15 and still lived at home when William Sr. died and Florence Louisa Brandt was an adult living on her own. Years earlier Mrs. Ziegler had taken an intense dislike toward Florence and upon reaching adulthood Florence abrogated the adoption. Ziegler Sr.'s will gave Junior the bulk of the estate when he turned 21 on July 21, 1912, and was held in trust until then. It was provided that the payment of the principal of the entire estate should be made to the son in four installments as he reached the ages of 25, 30, 35, and 40 years. Legal questions arose regarding executor and trustee roles after one of the trustees died and petitions were filed by Electa and Florence, who sought to reverse her abrogation on the grounds that her biological mother, Anna Nutting Brandt Haney, never consented to the abrogation. In 1913, when her petition was denied, Florence was a 27-year-old kindergarten teacher in Davenport, Iowa, and William, Jr., inherited $16,500,000. The conflict created ground-breaking case law involving adoption and the abrogation of adoption. 

    In 1907, Ziegler's mother, who had another son who was blind, founded the Matilda Ziegler Magazine for the Blind, which soon became the worlds most widely circulated periodical that is printed in braille and a publication that still thrives more than a century later. Upon leaving Harvard, William Jr. bought three apartment buildings on Manhattans Park Avenue through which he "played a major part in the development of that thoroughfare," according to the New York Times.  He subsequently became president of his fathers company, which later became American Maize-Products. 

    Upon Matildas death in 1932, however, William Jr. turned his attention to her pet project, succeeding her as the magazine s publisher and later becoming president of the American Foundation for the Blind. He remained the magazines publisher until his death in 1958. After his death, Helen Keller wrote a letter of tribute to the New York Times for his activities in support of the blind. 

    Frederick Sterner(1862-1931) was a native of England who came to this country in the 1870's. He settled in Denver, Colorado where he practiced architecture for nearly thirty
years. Among his important commissions were the Denver Athletic Club and the Greenbrier Hotel in White Sulphur Springs. In 1909 Sterner moved to New York where he received many commissions for the remodeling of town houses.

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