Friday, December 16, 2022

CHRISTMAS COMES TO THE NEW YORKER'S FAT LADY AND HER BUTLER

 By Helen E. Hokinson and made famous by their periodic appearance on the covers of Manhattan’s sophisticated weekly, the dowager and her manservant have traveled the world, effectively satirized one phase of America’s hopeless servant problem.


CHRISTMAS COMES TO THE NEW YORKER'S FAT LADY AND HER BUTLER

 One of the 20th century's most influential cartoonists, Helen Hokinson (1893-1949) chronicled the social comings and goings of the middle-aged American matron in the pages of the New Yorker for nearly a quarter century. She traded her early aspirations to become either a painter or a fashion illustrator for life as a cartoonist after one of her early cartooning efforts was accepted for publication by the newly founded magazine in 1925. Hokinson's cartoons were peopled with what came to be known as "those Hokinson ladies." The ladies of Hokinson's cartoons, all of them "slightly overweight, behatted, and ranging in mental state from outright addled to merely puzzled, populated garden clubs, library societies, civic meetings, and luncheons, and they entertained numberless notions and aspirations that were at once ridiculous and engagingly innocent," according to a profile of Hokinson in Her Heritage: A Biographical Encyclopedia of Famous American Women.


Archives at Yale.



Tuesday, December 13, 2022

"Casa Rosita" Miami Beach Studio Home of Henry Salem Hubbell

 In February of 1924, Hubbell and his wife, Rose, a writer of considerable distinction, arrived in Miami Beach for the first time and spent the season in the area. According to the City directories, Hubbell resided at 1039 18th Street from 1926 until 1929. In 1930, Hubbell moved to 1818 Michigan Avenue, located immediately west of 1039 18th Street, and resided there until 1940.

THE HERALD, MIAMI, FLORIDA. FRIDAY, AUGUST 15, 1924


HENRY SALEM HUBBELL HOME AT MIAMI BEACH TO COST $20,000


WORK has been started by the Watson Corporation on the construction of the new winter home and studio of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Salem Hubbell, which is located at the intersection of Lenox avenue and Collins canal, Miami Beach.


This is to be a two-story reinforced concrete and hollow tile building, the first floor of which will contain a large living room, dining room, kitchen and butler's pantry. Also there will be a studio on the first floor 20x32 feet, while at the rear will be a patio 30x40 feet. A feature of this home is the wide opening on the north which overlooks the canal and from which there will be steps leading down to a boat landing on the shore of the canal. The cost of the home will be $20,000.


Mr. Hubbell is one of the leading artists of America and is well known in art circles all over the world. He has paintings in all of the leading art galleries of America and more than half a dozen of his paintings have been purchased by the French government. He also has painting's in several of the leading galleries of Europe


Mr. and Mrs. Hubbell spent last season at the Covington Arms apartments at Miami Beach and before leaving last spring for their summer home, “Sllvermine," Norwalk, Conn.. they purchased this home site at Miami Beach and arranged with the Watson Corporation for building their winter home.


Miami Tribune 03 Oct 1924


H. S. HUBBELL HOME NEARING COMPLETION


The Henry Salem Hubbell studio home is nearing completion at its delightful location overlooking Collins canal. Mr. Hubbell, who is now at his studio in Connecticut, has been collecting the furnishings for the place, and has sent down some interesting old doors and iron grille work.


Henry W. Hubbell, who planned the artistic house and has had charge of its construction, said Friday that he expected his parents to return to the Beach between October 15 and November 1.


One of the most attractive features about the house is the patio which will be screened over and used as an outdoor sitting room. The large living room and studio occupies practically the entire ground floor and opens out into the patio. The ceiling in this room will be of pecky cypress decorated  in the Spanish style.


The home will be completed by November 15 and many of the furnishings for it will be brought from Mr. Hubbell's Paris studio.


The home of Henry Salem Hubbell, the portrait painter, at Miami Beach, is a home built around a studio. The exterior is in the Spanish peasant style.

The house is located a few feet back from the canal in a grove of palms. It is of hollow tile with a rough plaster finish over blue and ochre.

A BIT OF VENICE AT MIAMI BEACH. FLA.



At the water entrance gondola posts reminiscent of Venice, frame the mirroring waters of the canal. At this point the canal is seventy-five feet wide.

Looking out front the patio through the front entrance. Here an old paneled door was adapted for a wicket. The floor of the patio is of vari-colored laid hit or miss, and the woodwork and overhead trusses of the screen roof are vermillion




The view from the front door across the patio to the water entrance. The house was designed and built by the owners son, Willard Hubbell.


Shown is a glimpse of the patio which has been screened across the top to support vines. 





1039 18TH STREET




IN THE PATIO
Portrait of Rose Strong Hubbell at "Casa Rosita"



Collins Canal, part of the Miami Beach waterfront, showing a view of the attractive residence of Henry Salem Hubbell at the left of the picture and his earlier home at the right.


 Miami Beach enjoyed the Venetian touch. Shown above is the residence and studio of artist Henry Salem Hubbell on the Dade Canal with gondolas moored outside. Hubbell painted portraits for wealthy vacationers. His home, at Michigan Avenue, was designed in 1925 by architects Schultze and Weaver, who also designed the Miami Biltmore Hotel and the Roney Plaza.


Gondolas in the Collins Canal in front of the Hubbell residence - Miami Beach, Florida.

A BIT OF VENICE ON THE COLLINS CANAL, MIAMI BEACH, FLORDIA



A 1939 photo shows position of the high water mark on the wall of 1818 Michigan Ave, along the Collins Canal. Also shown are the height of the high water mark in 2011 and its expected height in 2030 and 2060.



Sea Level Rise Creeping Up on Miami Historic Landmark


View from Dade Blvd across Collins Canal.

Property owners rights conflict with the neighborhoods historical designation and protections.

“too vulnerable to be retained”





https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Salem_Hubbell


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schultze_%26_Weaver




Architects Schultze and Weaver Lecture - 2011 Whitehall Lecture Series






The property located at 1818 Michigan Avenue was later sold to a New York family, Maxwell Lehrman and Joseph Ronai, around 1941. Hubbell subsequently moved in 1941 to 730 N.E. 90th Street in Miami Shores where he lived and served as President of Trailer Grove Incorporated, a tourist camp, until his death in 1949.

Hubbell's son, Willard, was the president of Hubbell and Hubbell, a general contracting firm established in 1925 and responsible for constructing many buildings in the Miami metropolitan area, including "Casa Casuarina" at 1116 Ocean Drive in Miami Beach (renowned as the recent home of the late Gianni Versace).


Fake or original detail?


Apartment conversion began early at 1818 Michigan Ave. In 1934 Hubbell was sited for making alterations on his home without a building permit to accommodate more than one family in a one-family residential section. 



Once an open covered terrace overlooking the canal.





HENRY SALEM HUBBELL STUDIO "SILVERMINE" NORWALK, CT.



Henry Salem Hubbell studio stands on land purchased by Hubbell in 1912. The renowned portraitist and his wife, Rose, bought the old farmhouse and barn, and within a few years their place and presence drew other artists. According to Rose, "We made it a place in which people wanted to play." Visitors will find that playful spirit is still alive.



Friday, November 25, 2022

Case #244



Old New England family. Prominent social and financial connections. Brilliant student. Groton four years. Harvard 1919-22. Won letter in two major sports. Substitute for No- 6 on crew. Socially inclined, but made no club. Humiliation fostered moody state of mind. After graduation, one year of big game hunting and exploration, Africa and Tibet. On return to U. S. offered position with well known bank. Capable but made no friends. Resignation accepted after one year. Tried one thing after another. Perceptible discouragement for apparent failure. Selling bonds (1925) . . .


Now (1927)Vice-President of growing Eastern bank. Happily married and residing in New York City because.........

LISTERINE


Nothing exceeds halitosis (unpleasant breath) as a social offense. Nothing equals Listerine as a remedy 

Monday, July 18, 2022

"Dark Hollow" in Ruins

Dark Hollow was hidden away in a thicket of woods at the bottom of a steep mile-long winding drive..... 

26 Dock Hollow Rd, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724











  
 .....terminated by an open central arch that led into a courtyard.

Stone obelisk and bronze urns flanked the entrance on either side of the white stucco carriage house.




"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.



"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.





"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.


"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.




"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.


"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.




"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.



"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.



"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.



"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.

  Dark Hollow was one of the North Shore’s most beautiful homes, an architectural gem designed by Danish-born Mons Tvede and Mott Schmidt in 1930. Built by Walter Jennings, who was chairman of the board of Standard Oil, and was given to his son Oliver Jennings for a wedding present. 

"Dark Hollow" first floor inside front.


Second floor hall that ran along the front side of house. Note the boarded up circular window.


One entered the house through glass French doors that open onto a rotunda that soars up forty-Five feet to a glass starburst design skylight.



At the second floor landing a wrought iron railing runs full circle around a balcony.

Railing supports were salvage before demolition.


Glass Starburst Skylight.











Roof Skylight.

Originally all the floors on the main floor were glazed Della Robbia blue.

Cole Porter, Baron Alexis De Rede, Mrs. Hugh Auchincloss, Princess Chavchavodye, who brought the alleged Anastasia, the only survivor from the Russian royal family, to America were some of the many guests who attended parties at the house.


The barrel vaulted ceiling in the living room rose to 42 feet.




"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.



"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.






"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.

"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.

"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.



"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.


"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.




The rear fa├žade faces on a grass terrace that stretches to the water's edge.



"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.






"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.




"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.


"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.



Side Porch.

"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.




Stairs to second floor.



Bedroom Alcove.




"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.



"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.



"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.




Detail of eaves.





Seawall Gate to the Sound.

Party guests came by private yacht and docked along the long wooden pier with lanterns strung along the railing for the occasion, while the sea wall was ablaze with dozens of flaming torches.



At one end of the sea wall was a pavilion with a copper domed roof. 


"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.



  The pavilion was open on four sides with louvered shutters.



Set into the wall was an marble altar from a chapel in Florence.




"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.

"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.



"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.



"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.


"Dark Hollow" from the Sound.

"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.

"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.



Unoccupied and left to vandals "Dark Hollow" was demolished in late 2011.



Vacant lot sold on 11/09/20 for $8,375,000.

Click THIS LINK to see where "Dark Hollow" stood at wikimapia.


"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.




"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.


"Dark Hollow" the Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings.




Subsequent owner of "Dark Hollow" was  Ella Jaffe Freidus(Ivory Tower)



Ella Jaffe Freidus and her husband Jacob Freidus.

Ella was caught up in her husbands dealings with the government, the longest running tax fraud in American history. She herself was charged with fraud by not disclosing income and "clandestine concealment of assets."



"Petitioner now resides in an 8,000 square-foot home on 20 acres, with an in-ground pool, 4 fireplaces, 715 feet of waterfront and a gazebo. At the time of trial, the house was on the market with an asking price of $3,950,000. The house, known as "Dark Hollow", has been described in the book The Mansions of Long Island, as "the most remarkable house on the east coast". Petitioner purchased this residence around 1967."

"Petitioner employed a live-in married couple to take care of Dark Hollow during the years in issue. One of the caretakers, Johnny Mongkauw, also served as petitioner's chauffeur."

The Golden Maharaja


This large earth-hue diamond was shown at the Paris World Fair of 1937 and was later loaned to the American Museum of Natural History for 15 years (circa 1975 to 1990) by its owner, Ella Friedus. Around 1991 she sold the stone for $1.3 million.



Ella sold 35 Picasso ceramic pieces on June 26, 1990, for $500,000. On December 27, 1990, she sold 187 Picasso ceramic pieces for $1,943,330.

COSSACK PLAYING A KOBZA
David Burliuk

Prior to her marriage to Mr. Freidus in 1967, Ella was an art dealer who collected art for an art gallery she owned on Long Island. She was also an agent for a well-known Russian artist, David Burliuk .


If records are correct Ella still lives on Long Island at the age of 100.

Follow THIS LINK for past posts on "Dark Hollow".