Friday, June 17, 2016

CAUMSETT - The Marshall Field III Gold Coast Estate

The Causmett Foundation
Forwarded by Marshall Field V

From Amazon - "Marshall Field III was 28 years of age and one of the richest people in the world when he came upon the idea of replicating the environment in which he had spent his youth. Raised and educated in England, Field sought the life of an English gentleman here in the United States. In 1921, Field purchased almost 2,000 acres of waterfront property on Long Islands North Shore, which would become Caumsett. Forty years later, Fields third wife, Ruth, opened bids for the right to purchase Caumsett and all that it had become. The highest bid, in excess of $5 million, came from a builder who planned to subdivide the estate and construct 700 homes. A second bid, from Robert Moses, then parks commissioner of New York State, was more than $1 million less. Ruth reflected on her life and what her late husband would have wanted. She turned to trusted adviser and confidant Adlai Stevenson and stated that she wanted to accept the lower bid. Fourteen months later, Caumsett State Park was born."

Follow THIS LINK for all post on Marshall Field  and "Caumsett".

Friday, June 3, 2016

Friday, April 1, 2016

COMING IN JUNE • THE "NORMANDIE"

Largest... most luxurious and beautiful of modern ships... the "Normandie" will set new standards of comfort and safety in ocean travel for many years to come.

On June 3 there will arrive in New York not merely another big liner, but a different kind of liner ... a superliner.

Neither size nor speed was the first consideration of the engineers who plotted her dynamic lines. Those qualities came later, as the result of a fresh approach to the basic problem of assuring our passengers maximum safety and convenience.

For the decoration of this super-liner . . . fifty years ahead of her time . . . the foremost artists of France were called into consultation. The Normandie decor . . . executed with the inimitable finish of French craftsmanship ... is beyond anything you have ever seen in brilliance. 

Imagine a ship 1029 feet long . . . 79,800 tons ... a dining-salon 400 feet in length, walled with molded glass, and entirely airconditioned ... a sun deck, clear of all obstructions, as long as two city blocks . . . an eighty-foot swimming pool . . . virtually every cabin in First Class with bath or shower, many with private decks ... a completely equipped theater . . . radio-telephones constantly in touch with both shores ... a staff of 1200 to assure your comfort.

Need we say that the chef and his corps of assistants are even now engaged in an amiable conspiracy to raise your appreciation of French Line food to new and quite entrancing heights?

You must see this ship! . . . The arrival of the Normandie in New York harbor with a distinguished passenger list will be an event in maritime history. Your Travel Agent can tell you more about her . . . and (if you are quick) arrange for early reservations. .. . French Line, 610 Fifth Avenue (Rockefeller Center), New York City.

FIRST ARRIVAL IN NEW YORK,   JUNE 3.   FIRST   SAILING  FROM   NEW   YORK,   JUNE 7.

ADDITIONAL   SAILINGS:     JUNE 22,   JULY 10,    AND   AUGUST 21,    SEPTEMBER 4




Other Sailings to England and France: ILE DE FRANCE, April 13, May 18, June 29 • PARIS, April 20, May 11 • LAFAYETTE, April 27, June 1 and 20   •    CHAMPLAIN, April 6, May 4

La Maison Franchise, 610 Fifth Avenue (Rockefeller Center), New York City
La Maison Francaise, the French building in Rockefeller Center, was dedicated to the commerce, industry and art of a great European nation. Its tenancy was restricted to French individuals and companies, or to the American representatives of French companies handling products of the French Republic and colonial possessions.

La Maison Franchise, 610 Fifth Avenue (Rockefeller Center), New York City

The Fifth Avenue entrance to the building bears a sculptured panel, symbolic of the friendship and mutual understanding between the cities of Paris and New York. It was designed by Alfred Janniot. The panel is 11 feet wide and 18 feet high. Cast in bronze and then gold-leafed, the sculpture weighs approximately ten tons. It depicts Paris and New York joining hands above the figures of Poetry, Beauty and Elegance.


Wednesday, February 10, 2016

HOUSE OF C.T. SOUTHWICK, ESQ., GREAT NECK, N.Y.

    Nassau County Property Card states - "Rolling wooded land, fine shore view - good roads, well landscaped. Old English type constustion - interior and exterior. Property purchased in a 1932 foreclosure for $48,000 (A very good buy)."

ENTRANCE FRONT, HOUSE OF C.T. SOUTHWICK, ESQ., GREAT NECK, N.Y.
 ARTHUR W. COOTE, ARCHITECT

DETAIL OF ENTRANCE FRONT, HOUSE OF C.T. SOUTHWICK, ESQ., GREAT NECK, N.Y.
 ARTHUR W. COOTE, ARCHITECT

GARAGE WING, HOUSE OF C.T. SOUTHWICK, ESQ., GREAT NECK, N.Y.
 ARTHUR W. COOTE, ARCHITECT

FIRST FLOOR, HOUSE OF C.T. SOUTHWICK, ESQ., GREAT NECK, N.Y.
 ARTHUR W. COOTE, ARCHITECT
SECOND FLOOR, HOUSE OF C.T. SOUTHWICK, ESQ., GREAT NECK, N.Y.
 ARTHUR W. COOTE, ARCHITECT

HALL AND STAIRWAY, HOUSE OF C.T. SOUTHWICK, ESQ., GREAT NECK, N.Y.
 ARTHUR W. COOTE, ARCHITECT

ONE SIDE OF LIVING ROOM, HOUSE OF C.T. SOUTHWICK, ESQ., GREAT NECK, N.Y.
 ARTHUR W. COOTE, ARCHITECT

     Built in 1927. I've yet to find information on who C. T. Southwick was. Arthuw W. Coote was an architect with the firm Tooker & MarshAccording to Paul Mateyunas home was later purchased by Carroll Earle. Earle was a well-known Nassau and New Jersey contractor, who built the State causeway to Jones Beach State Park and the Northern blvd. from the city line at Little Neck to Roslyn. He died in 1929.  The house still stands. Follow THIS LINK to see.


Southwick property shown at the end of Hicks Lane with frontage on Manhasset Bay.
E. Belcher Hyde, Inc., 1927


Sunday, January 31, 2016

THE EASTMAN KODAK SHOP 356 MADISON AVENUE NEW YORK CITY

EASTMAN KODAK SHOP
NEW YORK CITY, N. Y.
WALTER D. TEAGUE. Designer; R. B. SHERBOURNE, Associate

COLOR: The entire design was conceived as providing a neutral setting for the display of the photographic enlargements and the various colorful objects of Eastman Kodak manufacture. It was executed, therefore, in varying tones of silver, gray, and black. The finish of the various materials was chosen with the same object in view. The display space draws the eye because it is of a light, dull finish in contrast to the dark, polished enframement.

MATERIALS: The facia and window bases are of emerald-pearl granite, but appear almost black in comparison with the other materials. The lettering, the muntins in the window soffits, and the pattern over the entrance are of polished chrome plate. The window frames and settings, the doors, and the grilles in the window bases are of benedict nickel. The walls of the show windows are of wood, flush panelled and inlaid with vertical strips of polished chrome plate. They were lacquered white and then sprayed with a silver mist, giving a light, neutral gray background to the objects on display. The lighting is entirely from above, the soffits being units of frosted glass.

DESIGN: The display counters have been kept low, better to attract attention, and the objects are displayed on plain standards of a finish similar to that of the walls. The grilles in the window bases serve as air intakes for a system of conditioned ventilation, which furnishes cleaned, heated and humidified air to all parts of the store. Clips are used at the window corners as an aid to complete visibility instead of the usual frame, and ornament is confined to the entrance where it does not attract attention from the windows.


EASTMAN KODAK SHOP
NEW YORK CITY, N. Y.
WALTER D. TEAGUE. Designer; R. B. SHERBOURNE, Associate

A DISPLAY WINDOW

SECTION THROUGH ENTRANCE

The walls of the store have been furred out far beyond the faces of the building columns to permit a symmetrical design as well as to provide space for ventilating ducts and the show cases. The wall cases are integral parts of the design, are flush with the wall and are lighted from behind.

EASTMAN KODAK SHOP
NEW YORK CITY, N. Y.
WALTER D. TEAGUE. Designer; R. B. SHERBOURNE, Associate

EASTMAN KODAK SHOP
NEW YORK CITY, N. Y.
WALTER D. TEAGUE. Designer; R. B. SHERBOURNE, Associate

Looking from the entrance toward the rear of the store. A neutral setting for the display of merchandise has been developed here as well as on the exterior, the general color scheme being silver, silver gray, and black. The floor is composed of three tone gray and black terrazzo, laid in blocks to form an irregular pattern which is outlined by wide strips of benedict nickel. The walls are panelled in English hardwood of a light, silver gray tone. The wood is laid in flush panels to take advantage of the variation in the grain. Black formica is used as a baseboard and as an outline of the wall cases. The pilaster caps, the cornice, and the moldings are of unpolished chrome plate.


Looking from the Cine-Kodak Room toward the entrance. The rug is rose—the only note of color in the shop—and the furniture is silver. The steps are black marble and the railing is chrome plate. The lighting throughout the store is indirect; the fixtures are executed in polished chrome, those in the ceiling being simple rectangular boxes with sides and bottoms of opal glass, and those on the walls being prisms of the same materials. At the rear of the shop, under the mezzanine, are two small projection rooms where amateur photographers can view their own moving pictures in privacy. Both rooms are treated in rose and silver, with silver furniture and lighting fixtures of chrome plate.

CINE-KODAK ROOM

DETAIL OF WALL CASE

 Walter Dorwin Teague (1883 - 1960) is considered one of the founding fathers of industrial design as well as one of the most prolific American industrial designers in history.  He established his design office in the late 1920s, which continues today as one of the important design institutions in the world.  His most notable design work includes Kodak cameras from 1927 to 1957, Texaco’s art deco gas stations in the 1940s, the Boeing Stratocruiser, and the 707 aircraft.

The Eastman Kodak Shop at Madison Avenue and Forty-fifth street is no longer in operation.


Sunday, January 10, 2016

"WHITEMARSH HALL" EDWARD T. STOTESBURY WYNDMOOR, PENNSYLVANIA Upper Terrace and Garden Facade

"WHITEMARSH HALL" EDWARD T. STOTESBURY WYNDMOOR, PENNSYLVANIA
 
Upper Terrace and Garden Facade
ARCHITECT, HORACE TRUMBAUER - LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT, JACQUES AUGUSTE HENRI GREBER


Follow THIS LINK for all posts related to "Whitemarsh Hall".

Saturday, December 19, 2015

The Tiffany House - The House of a Hundred Flues.

    The mansion of Mr. Tiffany at Madison avenue and Seventy-second street is virtually completed as to its exterior. It must be almost, if not quite, the largest private dwelling in New York, measuring 100x100 on the ground, and thus filling four lots. The northernmost 20 feet on the avenue side are given up, apparently, to another house, which, however, counts architecturally as part of the main building. There is a basement of a story and a half, three full stories below the cornice and one full story above, lighted on one side from the main gable, and on the other from openings in smaller gables and by dormer windows. The main ridge runs east and west, and the pitch of the main roof is steep. The foot of the gable is 80 feet wide, and being above the fifth story its crest cannot be very much less than 100 feet from the ground.


NW corner of Madison Ave. and 72nd St.
Date of View c.1885
    
    These dimensions would suffice to make the house very conspicuous. It is further made conspicuous by its unusual material, the basement being of rock-faced blue stone, the walls above of a yellowish brown clay curiously speckled with black, which is used both in brick and terra cotta, and the roof is of glazed and corrugated black tile. It is only the novelty of this material that makes it conspicuous. It is quiet in color and its mottled surface offers a very effective coutrast to the blue stone of the basement. It has the great advantage of making a brand new building look as if it might be old, without invoking any trickery to that purpose. Upon the selection and arrangement of material in their work at least the architects, Messrs. McKim, Mead & White, are to be heartily congratulated.

    The composition of the Madison avenue front is broad and simple, perhaps too simple for its dimensions and tending to monotony, but this, as our buildings go, is a fault on the right side. At the street corner there is above the basement an attached turret, carried on a heavily but simply moulded corbel of blue stone. The openings in the basement are square-headed, treated with entire simplicity to as to give additional value to the masaiveness of the masonry, and surmounted by a moulded string course, repeated a foot or two above in the brickwork, which might properly have been moulded more emphatically. Nevertheless, there is no niggling in the handling anywhere, and the rocky field of wall has its full value and becomes not only an impressive but a very agreeable object.

    It is in the brickwork that the simplicity of the general composition tends to monotony, while there is here a niggling in the treatment of detail that contradicts to some extent the absolute magnitude and the broad treatment of the masses. There is no "rhythm", as the Germans say, in the arrangement of the openings, and one source of effect is thus foregone. Fortunately the lateral piers are kept ample, and the expanse of wall is so great that many more holes might be punched in it without seeming to weaken it. The openings themselves, except in the gable, are covered with flat arches in narrow bricks, carrying each a series of mouldings, and these same mouldings are repeated down the jambs, while the sills also are in brickwork. It is this minute treatment, repeated everywhere, that gives the effect of niggling.

    The features of this front are a balcony, with a brick "breasting" apparently corbelled out in brickwork, that is projected from the northern half of the wall and stops against the angle turret, and a large mullioned window of five openings, with a semi-ciicular arch turned over the central three, in the central field of the gable, the mullions and transoms apparently in terra cotta.

    The feature of the basement on the street front is an arch of unusual span, and with very deep voussoirs nearly in the centre, which contains a driveway, and also a small stoop of rubbed blue stone within the recess. There is a corbelled window also in blue stone west of this arch. Above, the brick wall is deeply withdrawn at the centre of the front, and the masses flanking this recess are crowned with gables. Over the centre of the recessed wall is a large dormer with three tiers of openings. An open balcony in an upper story at the west end of this front is another of its features. The treatment of the openings in this front is in general similar to that already described, and has the same effect of contradicting rather than enlivening the breadth of the general treatment. The basement is excellent. The only quarrel one can pick with it is that it is scarcely appropriate to the domestic character except of a fortified dwelling; but it is so good in itself that we are glad to let that pass. The recessed balcony at the west end is also very good in itself, but the boldness and massiveness of its treatment are out of keeping with the framing of the other openings, and it is so placed that its own outer abutment seems insufficient, while for the first time in the whole design the terminal pier is apparently weakened.

     The disposition already described of a recessed centre and projecting wings is effective in relieving the monotony of the great roof, which is further diversified by the emergence at the angle of the turret-hood. This makes the unbroken gable on the avenue front seem all the balder, and the architects must now regret that they did not arrive at some device for subdividing it without interfering with its repose, as has been discreetly and successfully done with the south front.

    The composition in perspective is very spirited and picturesque, in spite of the blankness of the great gable. The fault one finds at last with the building is that it is scarcely a building, as a work of architecture must primarily be. That is to say, it seems like an attempt not so much to make a picture out of a building as to make a building out of a picture. For example, besides the features which break it, the roof is animated by a number of chimney stacks, which have the air of having been employed without reference to the interior economies, solely to punctuate a perspective. They come in very well, but so very frequently that one is forced to believe most of them dummies. They appear to contain something over a hundred flues, and, large as the house is, a hundred and odd flues really stagger credulity. The same disregard for structural propriety appears elsewhere, and notably in the two chief features of the avenue front, the brick balcony and the great mullioned window of the gable. It seems mechanically impossible that a balcony of this projection should be really built in brick, and the spectator is driven to assume an iron girder upon which the bricks that pretend to carry the balcony are merely plastered. Again, the great window has an arch turned over it, the constructional function of which would be to relieve the mullions of the window from the weight of wall above. For this purpose the arch should either span the whole opening, or the vertical supports under it should be thickeoed, and a flat arch or a heavy lintel, or some constructive appliance visibly sufficient to its work, should protect the lateral openings not relieved by the arch. Here, however, the relieving arch is actually turned between two intermediate mullions no heavier than the rest, and the wall on each side bears directly upon the window frame which the presence of the arch asserts is incompetent to sustain it. Such structural solecisms as this go far to give an unreal and fistitious character to a building which in general composition, in choice and arrangement of material and in many points even of detail is thoroughly admirable.


TIFFANY BRICK
Made under Stanford White's own direction.

Follow THIS LINK  for all past posts relating to the Tiffany house at Madison Avenue and 72nd Street.

Thursday, December 17, 2015

DESIGN FOR A CHRISTMAS CARD


Greville Rickard, 1925

      Pulitzer Fountain, with Cornelius Vanderbilt's mansion and Heckscher Building in the background.

 Architect Greville Rickard climbed to considerable fame, receiving the Architectural Gold Medal Award of the Fifth Avenue Association and a similar award from the Greenwich Real Estate Board for the finest residence.

   The Fifth Avenue Association awarded annual medals for the best new and altered buildings in the Fifth Avenue District. 

Monday, November 23, 2015

FIFTH AVENUE, LOOKING NORTH FROM FIFTY-FIRST STREET, CIRCA 1880'S

FIFTH AVENUE, LOOKING NORTH FROM FIFTY-FIRST STREET, CIRCA 1880'S 
    At the corner is William H. Vanderbilt's 640 Fifth Avenue home. William K. Vanderbilt's home can be seen along with St. Thomas church and the Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church further down the avenue. Follow THIS LINK for more.