Monday, January 13, 2014

"Dark Hollow"; A House of Palladian Inspiration Facing Upon Long Island Waters

   "Dark Hollow" was built by Walter Jennings, who was chairman of the board of Standard Oil, and given to his son Oliver Jennings as a wedding present. 


"Dark Hollow" sits at the bottom of a steep winding drive that ends at the carriage house and entrance courtyard.  
The Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings. Mott B. Schmidt and Mogens Tvede, associate architects.

  Through the arched entrance the court shown below is reached.

Summer beach house(note the sand) inspired from one of the 57 palaces owned by Prince Yusupov, the man who reportedly killed Rasputin.
The Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings. Mott B. Schmidt and Mogens Tvede, associate architects.

   Not only is this house designed in the style of the Renaissance master, Palladio, but the architectural motif which bears his name is the basis for front and rear facades, and the central features of these, as well. The Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings. Mott B. Schmidt and Mogens Tvede were associate architects. Follow THIS LINK to read more on this "association".


Built above a three-hundred foot long sea wall with sweeping views of Cold Spring Harbor.
The Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings. Mott B. Schmidt and Mogens Tvede, associate architects.

   The rear facade, a view of which is given, faces on a grass terrace that stretches to the water's edge.

Through a 20-foot-tall arched Palladian doorway, the rotunda in the entry hall rose forty-five feet and the star pattern of the light fixture is repeated in a large skylight and on the terrazzo floor outlined in brass. At the second floor landing a wrought iron railing runs full circle around the balcony.
The Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings. Mott B. Schmidt and Mogens Tvede, associate architects.
  
  A house-depth living room, whose huge proportions can be seen below, is entered through a circular entrance hall floored in blue terrazzo.


The house interiors were decorated in  a blue-and-white Art Deco style. All the floors on the main floor were glazed in Delia Robbia blue tiles. The barrel vaulted ceiling in the living room rose to 42 feet. 
The Cold Spring Harbor home of Oliver Burr Jennings. Mott B. Schmidt and Mogens Tvede, associate architects.

Party guests would arrive by private yacht and dock along a long wooden pier hung with glowing lanterns, while the sea wall was lined with flaming torches.

At one end of the sea wall stood an open pavilion with a copper domed roof, aged to a beautiful turquoise and topped by a marble urn.


Unoccupied and left to vandals "Dark Hollow" was demolished in late 2011. Note the bordered up windows and deteriorating roof.


"Dark Hollow" before demolition.

As of September 2013 the land remained vacant.

Click THIS LINK to see where "Dark Hollow" stood at wikimapia. Bing Maps still has the house standing, click HERE to see.

The Arkhangelskoye Palace was finished in 1810, after it was purchased, while under construction, by Prince Nikolai Yusupov.

Yusupov altered the palace to better display his 16,000-volume library and collection of paintings.

  Hints of inspiration can be found in another of the Prince's palaces located  in Leningrad, The Yusupov Palace

6 comments:

  1. don't know why they demolished the gazebo/pavillion along the sea wall when they demolished the main house. That would have been a wonderful architecturally unique structure to have for any new property owner

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  2. SHAME on the Township...WHO would have allowed such a beautiful gem to be demolished....rather give it away with incentive for restoration than this...even the trees are weeping!

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  3. Such a wonderful house. A couple of dentists bought it as an 'investment' if I remember correctly?

    I found a quote by Richard Nickel which I seem to be spreading around the blogosphere today---it so aptly applies in this age of wanton demolition. It goes like this: "Great architecture has only two natural enemies: water, and stupid men."

    Amen.

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  4. It’s a beautiful house, albeit with a dark history. Are there any pictures of the interior in color? That would’ve been very lovely to see. It’s sad that the town decided not to have the property restored.

    Arthur Bryant @ ContractorExpress

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    1. I do not know the issues but I have read its been featured in fashion shoots in a variety of magazines.

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